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Table 1 Malarial invention patents filed by domestic and foreign entities and its grant ratiosa

From: Domestic trends in malaria research and development in China and its global influence

Fields 1985–1994 1995–2004 2005–2014
  Domestic Foreign Domestic Foreign Domestic Foreign
  All Public Private All Public Private All Public Private All Public Private All Public Private All Public Private
Vaccines 0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
12 (8.3%) 1
(0)
11 (9.1%) 4
(75.0%)
3 (66.6%) 1 (100%) 38 (42.1%) 13 (30.8%) 25 (48.0%) 21 (57.1%) 15 (66.7%) 6 (33.3%) 111 (12.6%) 29 (13.8%) 82 (12.2%)
Drugs 3 (33.3%) 1 (100%) 2 (0) 3 (33.3%) 0
(0)
3 (33.3%) 11 (81.8%) 3 (100%) 8 (75.0%) 21 (42.9%) 5 (60.0%) 16 (37.5%) 34 (38.2%) 9 (55.6%) 25 (32.0%) 80 (11.3%) 17 (11.8%) 63 (11.1%)
Diagnostics 0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
3 (33.3%) 1 (100%) 2
(0)
1 (100%) 0
(0)
1 (100%) 7 (57.1%) 2 (100%) 5 (40.0%) 3 (33.3%) 2
(0)
1 (100%) 40 (15.0%) 9 (22.2%) 31 (6.3%)
Total 3 (33.3%) 1 (100%) 2
(0)
18 (16.7%) 2 (50%) 16 (12.5%) 16 (81.3%) 6 (83.3%) 10 (80.0%) 66 (43.9%) 20 (45.0%) 46 (43.5%) 58 (43.5%) 26 (57.7%) 32 (60.0%) 231 (12.6%) 55 (14.5%) 176 (10.8%)
  1. Grant ratios are reported in parentheses. Patents that were documented to be used in multiple areas, were counted repetitively so as to fully illustrate the R&D activities in certain areas
  2. aThe field is classified on the basis of international patent classification (IPC) taxonomy. Universities and research institutes are categorized as public applicants, while companies and individuals as private applicants