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Table 1 Health emergency practice launched by China CDC’s EOC during 2017–2018

From: Experience and practice of the Emergency Operations Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention: a case study of response to the H7N9 outbreak

Period Outbreak/disaster Type Location Response levela Comments/action taken
January–July, 2017 H7N9 Infectious disease outbreak 22 provinces, China III Coordinated departments to develop the epidemiological and lab test strategy
August–October, 2017 Earthquake Nature disaster Sichuan and Xinjiang, China II Deployed team to the field for the public health prevention and control
November, 2017– January, 2018 Plague Infectious disease outbreak Madagascar II Deployed team to the field for the public health prevention and control
July–Sepetember, 2018 Flood Nature disaster Sichuan and Gansu, China III Deployed team to the field for the public health prevention and control
July–October, 2018 Group events caused by substandard vaccines Infectious disease outbreak Shandong and Jilin, China I Assess the risk of problematic vaccine and develop reseeding strategies
July–October, 2018 Polio virus Infectious disease outbreak Xinjiang, China III Strengthen sampling and case monitoring, formulate vaccination strategies
  1. aThere are three different levels of China CDC’s response depending on the scale of the event. (i) Level III is the lowest level of response. Only one or two subject matter department lead to the response with their staff. However, EOC would not be activated. (ii) Level II involves more than two departments staff, or the relevant area and resources from the China CDC. Time-sensitive tasks and needs may extend beyond core business hours. EOC staff may lead or assist with the response. (iii) Level I is the highest level, requiring all agency-wide effort